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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 4
CSPAN 3
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 2:00am EST
phones are being monitored by the national security agency. that's according to a "the washington post" according to edward snowden. the spy agency says it does not collect data from phones in the u.s. >> the rescuers are holding out little hope for whales stranded in the ever glades. 4 dozen short-finned pilot whales swam into the shallows. six died. vets youthanized four more. a wealthy neighbourhood in louisiana wants to form its own city. we have more from baton rouge. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren at baton rouge. >> they are not in school, but he knows education will be the key to a better life. >> i want them to go to school and learn what they can. >> it's a challenge in a city where 60% of the students are not learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems. how many generations of children do you disserve before you try sag different. >> lionel rainy is part of a group pushing for a different plan. the city of st george would encompass an area home to a quarter of the residents. if would control and run its own schools with tax re
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 3:00am EST
.s. national security agencies is gathering billions of records from mobile phones around the world. that's according to leaked top secret documents given to the washington post by whistleblower edward snowden. it is said to track the movement of people in ways previously unimaginable. they use code traveller to map relationships and movements. american oticials say what they said was legal and reports were used on what they call foreign targets. civil rights campaigner say it's a breach of privacy. >> you are walking along minding your business thinking you'd never be of interest. if you have one of these there's every possibility that they are tracking where you've been and who you were speaking to. according to new documents, it's revealed that the american spy agency is somewhere snt region of the 5 billion pieces of information. here is how it works. you identified as an intelligence target. it's sending out signals as you are walking around. it can work out where you've been and who you've been speaking to. and if they also have a mobile phone. when you go online you may be able to
PBS
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
. the details come from edward snowden, who leaked a trove of material from the national security agency last summer. intelligence officials maintain the data collection operation has thwarted a number of terror attacks. a presidential advisory panel has been reviewing the issue. its findings could come this week. we hear now from the tech world. brad smith is the general counsel and an executive vice president of microsoft. he's also speaking on behalf of the companies that signed today's letter. >> brad smith, welcome to the program. what is it that the government is doing that microsoft and the other companies want them to stop? well, throughout our industry we're concerned about the increasing reports that government surveillance including in the u.s. but also elsewhere has gone beyond what people understood. we see a need for reform. and specifically we're hoping that there will be clear legal rules, all of this should take place pursuant to the law there should be stronger executive oversight there needs to be enhanced review by the courts. and there needs to be a bit more transparency,
PBS
Dec 8, 2013 7:30am PST
been the envy of america's national security agency the sites according to investigative journalist duncan campbell i'm sweet and always have allowed recruitment intelligence relationship with food waste during the years the cold war i'm a fiend tend to secretly in. to the club hosts the big spots in which they all thought this would be nice to get to that prime minister in return for betraying the tennessean secure a whole austin ate those and many of their own citizens. sweden was the largest collaborate to europe with the internet typing program run by the fine arts group of english speaking countries um and it said it does so because of its direct access the cables to the baltic and it's no surprise that the chp and nsa would want that as well as everything else is that they can take from st despite the criticism some governments protect their spine programs is something essential day this week the editor of britain's got the new sky to face questioning by and pains he believes that the publishing it's nice that the nation's put a dent in national security. jenna's claim eighty
KRON
Dec 9, 2013 4:00am PST
." the letter follow revelations by former national security agency contractor edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs that critics say violate privacy rights >> i will highlight more of the weather when we return. >> ice, snow, and cold weather are causing problems all over the country. in addition to stranding numerous drivers and causing thousands of flight cancellations, andrew spencer reports the wintry storms are causing damage. >> it looks like an onion lucky place for you to have parked your car. it did not happen just once, rooftops were so heavy that have allegis failed to the street. take a look at some of the damage. the interstate was shut down does not see snow especially not like this. many drivers in little rock, ark. are used to the ice conditions. >> the residential areas are not clear. >> take a look at this the view from this error plane. across the country the weather cost thousands of flights to be canceled. so many people were stuck in dallas that they started to provide food for them. even the white house and the capital got a little bit of a dust
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 5:00am EST
. >> the u.s. national security agency is gathering billions of records from mobile phones worldwide according to leaked top secret documents given to the paper by former edward snowden. the report says 5 bill yop records every 24 hours allows u.s. intelligence officials to track the movement of people in ways that were unimaginable. using tools such as code traveller, which can map relationships geographically with people and their most. american people say it is legal. it's a breach of privacy. let's discuss it with the ceo of spark digital, a digital marketing and social media company. to know the n.s.a. is spying on people using their mobile phones, sure that is no surprise. what is interesting about that to you. >> what is interesting is what they are tracking. date, time, speed, trajectory. that's what they are keeping historical records of. what is a lot of people don't know is they are not just looking at it just at this moment, but backwards in time when the phone came online. >> code traveller, meaning they can work out which group of people from in proximity to each other.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00am EST
the u.s. national security agency is collecting billions of records of mobile phone locations from around the world every day. it is provided by edward snowden. we explain how a horrible phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network at the closest tower. when it does, your phone number is logged by the network, along with the tower you connected to, which means your location. if you're on the move, anyone with access to this information can track your route. the latest revelations suggest the n.s.a. is doing much more than just tracking individual suspects. by gathering and processing around 5 billion records each day, it is able to see which individuals are meeting or tracking together. >> you might be connected to a tower along with 100 other people. you move down the street and automatically you, fuel find connects to the next closest tower. let's say 20 of the 100 are moving the same direction you. move further down the road and say just five of the original 100
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 1:00pm EST
.s. national security agency is directing billions of records of mobile phone locations every day. how a mobile phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network. usually through the closest tower. as soon as it does, your phone number is logged with the network, along with which tower you have connected to. which means your location. >> if you are on the move, anyone with tract your rout. by gathering and processing 5 billion records each day, to see which individuals are traveling or meeting together. here is how it works. >> you may be connected to a tower, along with 100 other people. you move down the street, and automatically connects to the next closest tower. say 20 of the 100 are moving in the same direction you move further down the road, and say just five of the original 100 people, join you. a couple more towers and some time later just one person who is mirrored your movements. the assumption, you have some reason for being together. >> it raise as lot of question. it c
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 9:00am PST
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
intelligence agency lt. gen. michael flynn on national security. in a little more than an hour we will riata washington journal special on the national institutes of health. now, the head of the defense intelligence agency, lt. gen. michael flynn con challenges facing the intelligence community kind of unlimited resources and cyber threats. his comments at the institute of world politics are a little more than an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. my name is john. i am president of the institute. for those of you are new to the institute of world politics, i would like to just introduce us and our mission. we are independent graduate school on national security and international affairs. we specialize in teaching all of the different arts of statecraft by which we mean the various instruments of national power, military strategy, intelligence, counterintelligence, diplomacy, the many arts and public diplomacy and sought power such as culture of a policy, information policy, political action, and that sort of thing. economic strategy and now all of these
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 11:00pm EST
.remely other concerns involved in the u.s., has a national security agencies monitoring and mitigation scheme to diplomatic relations between colombia and the u.s.? -- monitoring communications, kate e maddock between clinton and the u.s.? between colombia and the u.s.? >> we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies all of the information in there for spied therefore if we had on our common enemies, it has been done with the cooperation of the colombian authorities and u.s. authorities. information off spying outside that spirit of cooperation. if i knew about that, of course i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america have been furious by revelations of u.s. eavesdropping. is there anger justified? >> nobody likes to be spied. , if some and spies on you, you have all the right to get mad. they are spying without permission. to china, china's investment in latin america continues to grow. the country signed bilateral agreements last week. can you tell us more about that columbia-china economic relationship? do you see the effect it would have on that
CSPAN
Dec 3, 2013 10:00pm EST
for the colombia site. loosh b -- looking to other concerns to the u.s., have the national security agencies had relations between the colombia and the u.s.? >> we have been sharing information on this for a long time. colombia's very particular country in the sense that we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies, all the information, and, therefore, we have spied on our common enemy ies. it has been done with a cooperation of the colombia authorities and the u.s. authorities. now, i don't know of information of spying outside that sphere of cooperation. if i knew about that, then, of course, i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america, of course, have been infuriated by revelations of u.s. eves dropping. is their anger justified? >> well, nobody likes to be spied, and i think, yes, nor somebody spies on you, you have all the right to get mad, and so they have all the right to get mad. they are spied without commission. >> looking to china, china's investment in latin america, of course, continues to grow, and the country signed more than 50 bilateral c
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 6:00am EST
are serious speakers who dealt with the agency's new said we should always treat national security with proper skepticism. the only story which any member of parliament directly referred to, the dep internet if anybody is interested. >> the second question is sanderson, the river to are announced this whole issue of information in the u. k, i will summarize what he said is the free press to hold the government to account, and the guardians played investigations, joining that, is it in this issue? and any author for this information? >> i think we just had a long and tortured debate about medicine and during that debate we heard repeated answers for all three party leaders that politicians would not interfere in the press and it seems to me the very first hurdle, parliament is in danger, and the transit of journalists. and we didn't want this in the public been. and intelligence agencies, once it is in the hands of the press, the press must be protected and the wonderful thing about america is a lesson we are still learning in this country. >> my question is in relation to the part that your ne
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 12:35am EST
, with the director of national intelligence, with the fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet office, the national security advisor, gchq themselves, and the dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order to be aware of their concerns before we published them. >> and so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of the 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, okay for publication? >> i think -- in terms of publishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones which have not yet been. >> we did a few more pages of documents that have been redacted. i would not expect us to publish a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. >> what about the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of those, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding which names to redact and which not --
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 10:00pm EST
house, with the director of national intelligence, with he fbi, with the nsa, with the national security council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet security e national advisor, gchq themselves, and dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order be aware of their concerns before we published them. so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, publication? >> i think -- in terms of ublishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones yet been. not >> we did a few more pages of ocuments that have been redacted. publishnot expect us to a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of hose, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding names to redact and which not -- the guardian ear, has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we'
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 12:00pm EST
, who had dealt with the agencies, who say we should always treat the claims of national security with proper. the only story which is a member of parliament has directly referred to was the so-called deacon net, which i'm happy to talk about if anyone's interested. >> thank you. second question is stay in anniston, the u.s. repertoire and counterterrorism just announced will be looking into this whole issue of intelligent and information given by the u.s. and the u.k. -underscore december said. they hold the government to account and some on suggestions from the tories and the investigation on the tabloid newspapers joining not. are you welcoming the u.n. investigation into this issue about the whole issue about getting an offer of information to the extent that? >> absolutely. we just had a long debate about levin said. during that debate, we heard repeated assurances from all party theaters that the competitions for not interfering the press. and i seems to me a very close hurdle parliament is in danger of farming. as i say, i put earlier that the general counsel of the nsa, so
PBS
Dec 4, 2013 5:30am PST
spilling in russia the japanese parliament that diet recently pasta that is setup to see us signed national security council it's a sixty member government launched its job is to coordinate all the ministries and other agencies are involved in japan's foreign and defense offense. the headquarters of the steel industry would be installed within the cabinet secretary. intel and the is a tenuous peace off two days of anti government protests for the first time the minute readers of the country have spoken they see the political situation is returning to normal slowly but surely often days of violent protests and eighty sheets though the press today he says been drilled out the possibility of any kind of cool warning to mention ministry saying the ministry forces would not take a beating know in what is an evolving political situation the bottom was a protest is when you get a rally of the national police headquarters in bangkok to force their way through the gates of the silent right to the protest leader us a pep talks about says the fight is going to go on despite efforts to defuse the crisi
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17